Explore the Universe with us!

Welcome to the National Schools' Observatory!

We hope that the article you've read has inspired you to explore a little more about space and careers in STEM!

This website has lots of information and activities which can help you do just that:

1. BE THE ASTRONOMER YOU WANT TO BE

To sign up to the NSO and have a go at using the Liverpool Telescope only takes a few moments and is completely FREE! If you're a teacher in the UK or Ireland then simply follow this link.  Otherwise you can still register and use the telescope for free using this link.

Or why not have a go at some of the suggested activities:

 

Spots on the Sun (NASA)

 

2. SUNSPOT DETECTIVE

Using sunspot data, help the European Space Agency to solve the following problem (suitable for age 14-18): In 2001 the European Space Agency (ESA) temporarily lost track of 300 low–altitude satellites. This coincided with a period of intense solar activity, signified by the presence of sunspots and associated flares. Using the information given on the NSO website, can you predict when the next period of high solar activity will occur?

 

 

Mountain on the Moon (NSO)

 

3. LUNAR MOUNTAINS ACTIVITY

Did you know that this July marks 50 years since the first time humans stepped on the Moon? Why not explore the Moon a little by using algebra and images of the Moon, you can calculate the height of a lunar mountain by measuring the length of its shadow (suitable for age 11-16). 

 

Asteroid Ida (NASA)

 

4. HUNTING FOR ASTEROIDS ACTIVITY

The Earth is constantly being bombarded by space rocks known as asteroids, thankfully most of these are very small and never reach the ground - but it's always good to check on the big ones! Using images from the telescope help to find asteroids near the Earth and check that they aren’t going to come too close (suitable for age 7-14)!

 

 

If these activities don't appeal then don't worry - there are plenty more - just register to get access to everything, like our quizzes, activities and more advanced projects.

Or why not learn a little about the Universe around us?

And don't forget to have a go at using the biggest robotic telescope in the world!

Good luck exploring!