Space Exploration

Astronaut on EVA
An astronaut on an EVA (extravehicular activity) on the
International Space Station
Credit: NASA

Humans have been travelling to space since the 1950s. We have used telescopes to study space for centuries, but it was the invention of massive rockets which finally let us explore space in person. Space exploration is complex and costly. This means it often takes more than one nation working as a team to successfully plan and launch a mission. 

Do you know what type of animal was the first to go to space? Or the name of the first British person in space? Discover more historical firsts in space.

Many NASA missions have sent people to space. You may have heard of the Apollo missions. But have you heard of the Gemini or Mercury missions? Explore the missions which were the first to send humans to space and to the Moon.

Many NASA missions have sent people to space. You may have heard of the Apollo missions. But have you heard of the Gemini or Mercury missions? Explore the missions which were the first to send humans to space and to the Moon. 

Humans have travelled as far as the Moon. But robots have been all over our Solar System! Do you want to know which space probe has gone further than any other? Did you know that robots have visited planets and asteroids? Learn where robots and space probes have explored.

You can't get astronauts to space without a rocket! Nations across the world have engineered rockets to send people to space. Private companies have also built massive rockets. Explore types of rockets and how they work.

Did you know since the 1970s there has always been a human in space! Astronauts live and work on Space Stations for long amounts of time. Discover past, current and future Space Stations

Scientists and engineers never stop trying to improve our knowledge of space. New technology and ideas will let us explore more of space in the future. Maybe people will live on Mars! Learn what the future of space exploration may include

Start a Space Debate in your classroom. What are the risks and benefits? Our activities for Primary and Secondary schools support pupils to discuss space exploration.