Maths

Investigate: Measure the Size of a Galaxy

Have you ever wondered how big a galaxy is? They contain millions to billions of stars but what does that really mean for size?

Reading about sizes in a book is one thing, but what if you could make an observation of a galaxy and then measure its size?



Picture of a galaxy with a ruler next to it and question marks


Measure Mountains on the Moon

Short Intro Text: 

Did you know there are mountains on the Moon? How tall do you think they are? Are they higher than mountains on Earth?

Complete this activity to find out! You will use high resolution images of the Moon and a bit of maths to investigate the answer.





Make a Play-doh Solar System

You may know that Jupiter is the largest planet in the Solar System, but do you know how much larger than the Earth it is?

Find out by creating a scale model of each planet in our Solar System!

 



The 8 planets of the Solar System made out of Play-Doh


Count the Stars!

Have you ever wondered how many stars you can see in the night sky? Did you know that the number you can see depends on where you are?



The silhouette of 3 children looking up at a starry sky


Make Your Own Impact Crater

Impact craters are made when a space rock (called a meteorite or asteroid) hits a rocky planet or moon. The impact makes a round hole in the surface, called a crater.



Photo of the Barringer Meteor Crater in Arizona


Maths with the Moon

Short Intro Text: 
The Apollo mission badge. It shows a large capital A between drawings of the Moon and the Earth. The constellation of Orion is in front of the A
The Apollo missions badge
Credit: NASA




Predict the Solar Cycle

The Sun is a constant presence in our life on Earth. It gives us the heat and light we need to survive. But it is not a stable place. The Sun is a ball of hot plasma which is constantly changing.



Predicting the Sun's Cycle


Explore The Moon's Surface

You have probably seen the Moon in the sky but have you ever studied it in detail?



The surface of the Moon with cartoon rulers and tally-counts


Kepler's Laws: Find the Mass of the Sun

Many years ago, a mathematician named Johannes Kepler created a set of rules explaining planets' movement in our Solar System.



The picture shows a cartoon portrait of Johannes Kepler in front of an artist's impression of the Solar System.


What Is Kepler's Third Law?



This is a cartoon image of Johannes Kepler and Isaac Newton with a parchment-like background. A diagram of a planet's orbit is featured in the middle behind the figures. To the right of the figures, is a cartoon of an apple falling.


Pages